Files

Download

Download Full Text (1.1 MB)

Abstract

Two field seasons of survey-level research at the Spalding Plantation on Sapelo Island, Georgia have been devoted to locating wood frame slave cabins. Shown on an 1857 map, these structures are difficult to recognize archaeologically due to the scarcity of definitive architectural remains; in essence, no foundation elements survive when wooden frame cabins are set on blocks of wood, tabby, or brick that are robbed after the cabins are abandoned. However, indirect evidence for the presence of cabins may take the form of nail distributions that occur in an inversely spatial relationship with secondary refuse discard at this site: nails would be expected to mark the former cabin locations, and middens should occur adjacent to, rather than in, the cabin footprints. Using GIS, such spatial signatures have been tentatively identified on Sapelo Island.

Department

Dept. of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Date

1-1-2010

Subject

Archaeology--Georgia--McIntosh County; Antiquities; Archaeology; McIntosh County (Ga.)--Antiquities

Location

Sapelo Island (Ga.); McIntosh County (Ga.)

Document Type

reports

Extent

12 leaves

Language

English

Call Number

F292.M15 H66 2010

Rights

Under copyright.

Defining frame slave cabins at the Thomas Spalding Plantation, Sapelo Island, Georgia

Share

COinS