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Abstract

Results of archeological testing-limited data recovery conducted at the Charleston Center Site by the Jeffrey L. Brown Institute of Archaeology are reported. The site consists of a single city block in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, occupied from the mid-eighteenth through twentieth centuries. The entire site is slated for development as a private hotel. Nine weeks of fieldwork were carried out in the spring of 1981 to determine the presence, extent, and condition of archeological resources in accessible areas of the site, and to evaluate the need for further mitigation. A total of 250 m surface area was excavated, resulting in the recovery of substantial intact, interpretable archeological remains. Data generated from fieldwork and documentary research is integrated and applied to research questions about the site's temporal parameters, structure and function, and patterns of eighteenth and nineteenth century resources utilization. The utility of several methodological approaches for interpreting historic site data are examined, including South's "pattern recognition" approach. Explicit models of animal exploitation and urban land use are also tested. Finally, suggestions for further research at similar sites in Charleston are presented.

Department

Dept. of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Date

10-1982

Subject

Excavations (Archaeology)--South Carolina--Charleston; South Carolina--Antiquities; Charleston Convention Center site (S.C.)

Location

Charleston (S.C.)

Document Type

reports

Extent

vi, 216 leaves

Language

English

Call Number

F279.C4 H77 1982

Rights

Under copyright.

An archaeological investigation of the Charleston Convention Center site, Charleston, South Carolina

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