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Abstract

More complete documentary information on the identity of residents of the British colonial town of Frederica has allowed revised interpretations of the archaeological record there. Two tightly controlled excavations in the town reveal contrasts in site structure, refuse disposal practices, faunal remains, and material culture from 1736-c. 1750. The Hird site, dating from 1736 to 1748, was occupied by a husband, wife, and their three children (a son and two daughters); the Forrester site, c. 1742-1754, is attributed to a (presumably) solitary adult male. This paper explores the possible gender, family composition, and social mobility dimensions of the archaeological contrasts in addition to spatial and temporal factors affecting these sites.

Department

Dept. of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Date

1-1-2000

Subject

Archaeology--Georgia--Fort Frederica National Monument; Antiquities; Archaelology; Fort Frederica National Monument (Ga.)--Antiquities

Location

Fort Frederica National Monument (Ga.)

Document Type

reports

Extent

13 leaves

Language

English

Call Number

F292.F7 H66 2000

Rights

Under copyright.

Gender, family composition, and social mobility at Fort Frederica, Georgia, 1736 - c. 1750

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