Project Director

Boyd, Jennifer

Department Examiner

Craddock, J. Hill; Adams, Callie

Department

Dept. of Biological and Environmental Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Species range migrations are a well-documented response to climate change (Loarie et al. 2009), with range shifts mainly occurring poleward or to higher elevations (Walther et al. 2002). As range shifts occur, variation in phenotypic traits within plant species across climate gradients could affect their abilities to acclimate or adapt to a changing climate (Hooper et al. 2005, Souza et al. 2011). In 2014 Dr. Jennifer Boyd (BGES) initiated a research project to examine potential intraspecific phenotypic variation within wide-ranging Appalachian plant species of responses to projected future atmospheric CO2 and temperature regimes. As an undergraduate research assistant, I focused on field identification and propagation of species selected for study (Carex aestivalis, Maianthemum canadense, and Solidago caesia), two aspects that determined the success of the larger research project. My research is presented in the form of a propagation manual to be utilized by future generations of students working on related research in Dr. Boyd’s lab.

Degree

B. S.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Date

5-2016

Subject

Plant-atmosphere relationships; Wild flowers; Forest ecology; Climatic changes

Keyword

Global change; Ecology; Intraspecific variation; Climate change response

Discipline

Environmental Sciences

Document Type

Theses

Extent

100 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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