Project Director

Wilson, Thomas P.

Department Examiner

Barbosa, Jose M.; Carver, Ethan A.

Department

Dept. of Biological and Environmental Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Four hundred and twenty-seven amphibian species are critically endangered. The fungal disease Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been correlated with amphibian decline and extinction. Numerous studies concerning the nature of Bd have been conducted; however, additional studies are needed to adequately evaluate Bd in southeastern Tennessee. As a result of previous studies, the following hypothesizes were proposed: watercourses in southeastern Tennessee will test positive for Bd, non-impacted streams will have a greater presence of Bd than impacted streams, and increased canopy coverage has a positive correlation with the presence of Bd. Field sampling took place from June 2nd 2016 to August 8th 2016 at four different watercourses: Stringer’s Branch, Ryall Springs Brach, South Suck Creek, and Prentice Cooper Wildlife Management Area. DNA was extracted from 48 Plethodontid swabs with the animal tissue protocol from the DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit. The results, run in triplicate, indicate that three samples of the species Eurycea wilderae, Eurycea cirrigera, and Desmongnathus monticola were positive for Bd. The positive samples indicate Bd prevalence in Stringer’s Branch and PCWMA’s Crater Lake.

Acknowledgments

This project was conducted under the auspices of the Biology, Geology, and Environmental Science Department at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and funded by the Provost Student Research Award. I would like to give my greatest appreciation to Dr. Wilson for his time, commitment, advice, field training, equipment, and comments on prior manuscript drafts. I also like to show my gratefulness to Dr. Carver for his laboratory space, laboratory materials, for training me on lab protocols, and for his insight on lab techniques. Also, special thanks to Dr. Barbosa for his guidance and input. I would like to also thank Team Salamander for their encouragement and support over the course of this study.

IACUC Number

0408

Degree

B. S.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Date

5-2017

Subject

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; Amphibians -- Research; Amphibians -- Tennessee

Keyword

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; Chytrid Fungus; Amphibian disease; Southeast Tennessee

Discipline

Biology

Document Type

Theses

Extent

84 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Included in

Biology Commons

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