Title

How to be the boss everyone wants to work for

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

One of the biggest and most difficult changes for any leader is the one from an individual contributor or professional who does the work, to a manager who must continue to do the work and more importantly, leads others doing their work. It’s important for a leader’s long-term career to make that transition as quickly and successfully as possible. It’s also important for the success and sustainability of any organization. Why? First-time managers make up the vast majority of the largest population of leaders in any organization – those at the entry- or first-levels of management. They directly lead a majority of people in organizations, as much as two-thirds of the workforce (De Smet, McGurk, & Vinson, 2009). They are the pipeline for future leadership positions in the organization. And, they represent the leadership benchstrength of the organization. Much too often, the leader and the organization take for granted just how difficult that transition is. Take note of these numbers: 20% of new leaders are doing a poor job according to their subordinates, 26% of felt they were not ready to lead others to begin with, and almost 60% said they never received any training when they transitioned into their first leadership role in the first place (CareerBuilder Survey, March 2011). No wonder 50% of managers in organizations are ineffective (Gentry, 2010; Gentry & Chappelow, 2009). Their ineffectiveness may be the result of not realizing what they are getting themselves into when it comes to leading others, not being supported in their new leadership role, and not being given the opportunity for training and development early enough in their careers as leaders. In this session you will learn: Why first-time managers and new leaders on the frontlines are so important to building a pipeline of leaders in organizations and why they need more help, support, and development. Based on research of close to 300 new leaders, the specific and unique challenges they have and the skill gaps that must be addressed. Practical, actionable tips and advice to help, support, and develop first-time managers and new leaders on the frontlines of organizations

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

presentations

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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How to be the boss everyone wants to work for

One of the biggest and most difficult changes for any leader is the one from an individual contributor or professional who does the work, to a manager who must continue to do the work and more importantly, leads others doing their work. It’s important for a leader’s long-term career to make that transition as quickly and successfully as possible. It’s also important for the success and sustainability of any organization. Why? First-time managers make up the vast majority of the largest population of leaders in any organization – those at the entry- or first-levels of management. They directly lead a majority of people in organizations, as much as two-thirds of the workforce (De Smet, McGurk, & Vinson, 2009). They are the pipeline for future leadership positions in the organization. And, they represent the leadership benchstrength of the organization. Much too often, the leader and the organization take for granted just how difficult that transition is. Take note of these numbers: 20% of new leaders are doing a poor job according to their subordinates, 26% of felt they were not ready to lead others to begin with, and almost 60% said they never received any training when they transitioned into their first leadership role in the first place (CareerBuilder Survey, March 2011). No wonder 50% of managers in organizations are ineffective (Gentry, 2010; Gentry & Chappelow, 2009). Their ineffectiveness may be the result of not realizing what they are getting themselves into when it comes to leading others, not being supported in their new leadership role, and not being given the opportunity for training and development early enough in their careers as leaders. In this session you will learn: Why first-time managers and new leaders on the frontlines are so important to building a pipeline of leaders in organizations and why they need more help, support, and development. Based on research of close to 300 new leaders, the specific and unique challenges they have and the skill gaps that must be addressed. Practical, actionable tips and advice to help, support, and develop first-time managers and new leaders on the frontlines of organizations