Title

Extending audience response systems to sexual harrassment prevention training

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Sexual harassment is detrimental to both individuals and organizations. Victims of sexual harassment in the workplace report increased depression, posttraumatic stress, work withdrawal, intentions to quit, and decreased productivity (Buchanan & Fitzgerald, 2008; Langhout et. al., 2005; Willness, Steel, & Lee, 2007). Recent research emphasizes the importance of universal sexual harassment training (Buchanan, Settles, Hall, & O’Connor, 2014). However, there is little research concerning how organizations might more effectively engage workers in such training. The proposed study would amend this lapse by drawing from the available literature on active student response (ASR) techniques, which have been shown to boost student engagement and interaction, increase honesty of student feedback, and create a safe environment for discussing potentially difficult topics (Fortner & Wood, 2013; Stowell & Nelson, 2007; Friedline, Mann, & Lieberman, 2013). The study will focus on three main hypotheses for application to sexual harassment training. First, that ASR systems will lead to higher levels of audience engagement in a training setting. Second, that utilization of these systems will increase information retention and lead to better performance on review tasks. Finally, that ASR will ultimately lead to fewer incidences of sexual harassment in the environment to which it is applied. Using a between subjects design, this study will compare three ASR conditions (hand raising, card flashing, or anonymous remote answering) between experimental and control groups. Training and review material will be scripted to maintain consistency. Upon completion of the review material, the subjects will be asked to complete the Student Perceptions of ASR Techniques (Keim, Sanders, Rada, & Earnest, 2016) and the Student Engagement Scale (SES) (Gunuc & Kuzu, 2015). Post-tests will be administered to measure the learning and retention of the material. According to the current literature, ASR systems have primarily been utilized in an educational setting. Therefore, the purpose of this study would be to examine whether ASR techniques could be extended to current sexual harassment prevention training to increase engagement and decrease further incidences of sexual harassment.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Extending audience response systems to sexual harrassment prevention training

Sexual harassment is detrimental to both individuals and organizations. Victims of sexual harassment in the workplace report increased depression, posttraumatic stress, work withdrawal, intentions to quit, and decreased productivity (Buchanan & Fitzgerald, 2008; Langhout et. al., 2005; Willness, Steel, & Lee, 2007). Recent research emphasizes the importance of universal sexual harassment training (Buchanan, Settles, Hall, & O’Connor, 2014). However, there is little research concerning how organizations might more effectively engage workers in such training. The proposed study would amend this lapse by drawing from the available literature on active student response (ASR) techniques, which have been shown to boost student engagement and interaction, increase honesty of student feedback, and create a safe environment for discussing potentially difficult topics (Fortner & Wood, 2013; Stowell & Nelson, 2007; Friedline, Mann, & Lieberman, 2013). The study will focus on three main hypotheses for application to sexual harassment training. First, that ASR systems will lead to higher levels of audience engagement in a training setting. Second, that utilization of these systems will increase information retention and lead to better performance on review tasks. Finally, that ASR will ultimately lead to fewer incidences of sexual harassment in the environment to which it is applied. Using a between subjects design, this study will compare three ASR conditions (hand raising, card flashing, or anonymous remote answering) between experimental and control groups. Training and review material will be scripted to maintain consistency. Upon completion of the review material, the subjects will be asked to complete the Student Perceptions of ASR Techniques (Keim, Sanders, Rada, & Earnest, 2016) and the Student Engagement Scale (SES) (Gunuc & Kuzu, 2015). Post-tests will be administered to measure the learning and retention of the material. According to the current literature, ASR systems have primarily been utilized in an educational setting. Therefore, the purpose of this study would be to examine whether ASR techniques could be extended to current sexual harassment prevention training to increase engagement and decrease further incidences of sexual harassment.