Title

LinkedIn vs. Facebook: examining job seekers' reactions to organizations' use of social media screening

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The use of social media screening has become an increasingly popular practice within organizations for selection purposes. However, little research has been conducted on applicant reactions to these selection procedures. The purpose of this study is to examine applicant reactions to social media screening and how this practice might affect the applicant’s perceptions of an organization. Previous research has suggested that the use of social media as a screening tool may cause applicants to perceive that their privacy is being invaded, which is linked to lower levels of organizational attractiveness. The results of this proposed study are expected to support the hypothesis that organizations that screen through professional social media (e.g., LinkedIn) will yield positive applicant reactions, whereas organizations that screen through personal social media (e.g., Facebook) will yield negative applicant reactions. The results of this study may help organizations better improve their selection procedures with regard to social media screening.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 22nd, 10:00 AM Oct 22nd, 10:55 AM

LinkedIn vs. Facebook: examining job seekers' reactions to organizations' use of social media screening

The use of social media screening has become an increasingly popular practice within organizations for selection purposes. However, little research has been conducted on applicant reactions to these selection procedures. The purpose of this study is to examine applicant reactions to social media screening and how this practice might affect the applicant’s perceptions of an organization. Previous research has suggested that the use of social media as a screening tool may cause applicants to perceive that their privacy is being invaded, which is linked to lower levels of organizational attractiveness. The results of this proposed study are expected to support the hypothesis that organizations that screen through professional social media (e.g., LinkedIn) will yield positive applicant reactions, whereas organizations that screen through personal social media (e.g., Facebook) will yield negative applicant reactions. The results of this study may help organizations better improve their selection procedures with regard to social media screening.