Title

How school-life balance affects student success

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The current work-life balance literature neglects university students from the population of typically studied participants by focusing solely on how work affects life. This does not consider the fact that many college students consider their school responsibilities as their “work”. The purpose of the current study is to fill this information gap. We aim to test the relationship between student-life balance and student success. We will also test the moderated effects of hours worked in a job setting and hours spent on a sports team in the school-life balance compared to a student’s success. We will be gather data on college students using a self-report survey. When this research is completed we will have a more inclusive understanding of how the stress of school is affected by outside components such as the number of hours a student works or the number of hours a student-athlete spends on their respected sport. The current study expects to find that school-life balance is positively correlated with student success and that the relationship between school-life balance and student success will be positively correlated for students who work or participate in sports and unrelated for those students who work or participate in sports. Implications for potential workshops in school/work-life balance in colleges or other interventions for students in higher education will be discussed.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Oct 22nd, 10:00 AM Oct 22nd, 10:55 AM

How school-life balance affects student success

The current work-life balance literature neglects university students from the population of typically studied participants by focusing solely on how work affects life. This does not consider the fact that many college students consider their school responsibilities as their “work”. The purpose of the current study is to fill this information gap. We aim to test the relationship between student-life balance and student success. We will also test the moderated effects of hours worked in a job setting and hours spent on a sports team in the school-life balance compared to a student’s success. We will be gather data on college students using a self-report survey. When this research is completed we will have a more inclusive understanding of how the stress of school is affected by outside components such as the number of hours a student works or the number of hours a student-athlete spends on their respected sport. The current study expects to find that school-life balance is positively correlated with student success and that the relationship between school-life balance and student success will be positively correlated for students who work or participate in sports and unrelated for those students who work or participate in sports. Implications for potential workshops in school/work-life balance in colleges or other interventions for students in higher education will be discussed.