Title

Social exclusion in teams

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Social exclusion can be defined as the inability to participate effectively in economic, social, political, and cultural life; alienation; and distance from the mainstream society (Duffy, 1995, as cited by Tong, Lai, Zeng, & Xu, 2011). Several studies examining the relationship between social isolation and depression have found significant results linking concepts of social isolation to depression (Abeln et al., 2015; Tong et al., 2011; Wesselmann, Nairne, & Williams, 2011). A previous study was conducted studying the link between depression and social isolation by participants completing a current mood scale and Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) to measure depression levels and a isolation stimulus used is called “Cyberball” (Hartgerink, Beest, Wicherts, & Williams, 2015), a ball-passing simulation computer game. Eighty-Three participants completed the previous study and no significant differences were found between depressed versus not depressed and isolated and non-isolated subjects. Due to the null effects of the previous study, the purpose of the proposed study is to replicate the methods of the previous study and further examine the effects of game play isolation on depression. In addition, the objective of the proposed study is to quantify any social isolation behaviors that were not reflected in the self report measures of the previous study through biographical measures of galvanic skin response (GSR) and electromyography (EMG).

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Social exclusion in teams

Social exclusion can be defined as the inability to participate effectively in economic, social, political, and cultural life; alienation; and distance from the mainstream society (Duffy, 1995, as cited by Tong, Lai, Zeng, & Xu, 2011). Several studies examining the relationship between social isolation and depression have found significant results linking concepts of social isolation to depression (Abeln et al., 2015; Tong et al., 2011; Wesselmann, Nairne, & Williams, 2011). A previous study was conducted studying the link between depression and social isolation by participants completing a current mood scale and Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) to measure depression levels and a isolation stimulus used is called “Cyberball” (Hartgerink, Beest, Wicherts, & Williams, 2015), a ball-passing simulation computer game. Eighty-Three participants completed the previous study and no significant differences were found between depressed versus not depressed and isolated and non-isolated subjects. Due to the null effects of the previous study, the purpose of the proposed study is to replicate the methods of the previous study and further examine the effects of game play isolation on depression. In addition, the objective of the proposed study is to quantify any social isolation behaviors that were not reflected in the self report measures of the previous study through biographical measures of galvanic skin response (GSR) and electromyography (EMG).