Title

The relationship between past leader experience and leadership attitudes

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The purpose of the current study is to examine the relationship between past leader experience and leadership attitudes. It is hypothesized that there will be a positive relationship between positive leader experiences and relationship-driven attitudes (servant leadership, transformational leadership, etc.) In addition, if a respondent has had a significant negative experience under another leader, it is hypothesized that the respondent’s leadership attitudes will be an inverse of said leader. In a previous study conducted at a small private undergraduate university, 115 college students were given the Leadership Virtues Questionnaire, or LVQ (Riggio, Zhu, Reina, & Maroosis, 2010), to assess their leadership values, the Inventory of Leadership Learning and Components of Wisdom in Higher Education (Yang, 2014) to assess their response to leadership experiences, and demographics to measure basic information and past leader ratings. The results did show a correlation between their experience under respondents’ most recent leader and the respondents’ reported attitudes, though the strength of said correlation varied, with negative experiences having stronger, if less frequent, significant correlations.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Oct 22nd, 10:00 AM Oct 22nd, 10:55 AM

The relationship between past leader experience and leadership attitudes

The purpose of the current study is to examine the relationship between past leader experience and leadership attitudes. It is hypothesized that there will be a positive relationship between positive leader experiences and relationship-driven attitudes (servant leadership, transformational leadership, etc.) In addition, if a respondent has had a significant negative experience under another leader, it is hypothesized that the respondent’s leadership attitudes will be an inverse of said leader. In a previous study conducted at a small private undergraduate university, 115 college students were given the Leadership Virtues Questionnaire, or LVQ (Riggio, Zhu, Reina, & Maroosis, 2010), to assess their leadership values, the Inventory of Leadership Learning and Components of Wisdom in Higher Education (Yang, 2014) to assess their response to leadership experiences, and demographics to measure basic information and past leader ratings. The results did show a correlation between their experience under respondents’ most recent leader and the respondents’ reported attitudes, though the strength of said correlation varied, with negative experiences having stronger, if less frequent, significant correlations.