Title

Stable inconsistency: a study of respondent inconsistency over time

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Personality measures are currently a popular method of selection in the business world, despite issues such as poor predictive ability and the potential for output manipulation by participants. Similarly, individuals sometimes respond differently on test items that otherwise measure the same facets of personality. This phenomenon has been called Respondent Inconsistency (Reddock, Biderman, & Nguyen, 2011). The focus of this study is to attempt to show the phenomenon as a measurable trait that is stable over time. The study will administer two different Big Five Inventories to participants taken from a local university. The two inventories will be administered with a time delay between them to ensure no carryover effects. Inconsistency measured as the mean standard deviation of responses within domains will be computed and then correlated across the two time periods to determine reliability of the inconsistency measure. High correlation will support our hypothesis that respondent inconsistency is stable across time.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Stable inconsistency: a study of respondent inconsistency over time

Personality measures are currently a popular method of selection in the business world, despite issues such as poor predictive ability and the potential for output manipulation by participants. Similarly, individuals sometimes respond differently on test items that otherwise measure the same facets of personality. This phenomenon has been called Respondent Inconsistency (Reddock, Biderman, & Nguyen, 2011). The focus of this study is to attempt to show the phenomenon as a measurable trait that is stable over time. The study will administer two different Big Five Inventories to participants taken from a local university. The two inventories will be administered with a time delay between them to ensure no carryover effects. Inconsistency measured as the mean standard deviation of responses within domains will be computed and then correlated across the two time periods to determine reliability of the inconsistency measure. High correlation will support our hypothesis that respondent inconsistency is stable across time.