Presenter Information

Sydney CooperFollow

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Past research has shown that individuals that engage in generative and elaborative learning techniques demonstrate a higher level of comprehension due to increased understanding across concepts (Brown, Roediger & McDaniel, 2014). Literature in this area has included investigating ways in which learners can actively engage in their learning to improve comprehension (Brown, et al., 2014). One learning technique that has been examined as a method for improving comprehension performance is self-generating questions (Bugg & McDaniel, 2012). The present study will build off previous studies that focused on the impact generating questions can have on retention in the short term, by investigating the impact that self-generating questions can have on long term retention (Weinstein, McDermott, & Roediger, 2010). This will entail implementing a three-week retention interval to measure retention across a typical forgetting curve of approximately 30 days. This will expand upon the typical intervals substantially to determine whether generative and elaborative study techniques truly benefit comprehensive learning in the long term. The present study will also focus on encouraging participants to develop strictly conceptual questions that engage the participant in linking concepts across the text. This focus on linking concepts will be emphasized by the addition of concept mapping, as a study strategy condition. Scores will be compared to determine the level of forgetting that took place in a comparison across four conditions (study, self-generate, self-generate and concept map, study and concept map). If significant, the results of this study could provide insights into how organizations can improve their training programs to maximize learning.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Oct 28th, 10:00 AM Oct 28th, 10:55 AM

Self-Generating Questions and Concept Mapping to Improve Long-term Recall Performance

Past research has shown that individuals that engage in generative and elaborative learning techniques demonstrate a higher level of comprehension due to increased understanding across concepts (Brown, Roediger & McDaniel, 2014). Literature in this area has included investigating ways in which learners can actively engage in their learning to improve comprehension (Brown, et al., 2014). One learning technique that has been examined as a method for improving comprehension performance is self-generating questions (Bugg & McDaniel, 2012). The present study will build off previous studies that focused on the impact generating questions can have on retention in the short term, by investigating the impact that self-generating questions can have on long term retention (Weinstein, McDermott, & Roediger, 2010). This will entail implementing a three-week retention interval to measure retention across a typical forgetting curve of approximately 30 days. This will expand upon the typical intervals substantially to determine whether generative and elaborative study techniques truly benefit comprehensive learning in the long term. The present study will also focus on encouraging participants to develop strictly conceptual questions that engage the participant in linking concepts across the text. This focus on linking concepts will be emphasized by the addition of concept mapping, as a study strategy condition. Scores will be compared to determine the level of forgetting that took place in a comparison across four conditions (study, self-generate, self-generate and concept map, study and concept map). If significant, the results of this study could provide insights into how organizations can improve their training programs to maximize learning.