Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Previous research has attempted to explain how Leader-member exchange (LMX) is related to subordinate affective commitment to organizations. Since affective commitment is highly related to employee turnover, understanding the effects supervisors have on affective commitment is of great importance for fostering high-quality relationships within the workplace. While previous research has been conducted on this relationship, past conceptualizations have yet to account for both the moderating effects of supervisor’s organizational embodiment (SOE) in conjunction with the mediating effect of perceived organizational support (POS). The current study proposes a comprehensive moderated mediation model, describing a path that accounts for variability due to employee perceptions of supervisors and organizations alike. The main hypothesis for the proposed study is that SOE will serve as a moderating variable such that the relationship between LMX and affective commitment will be stronger at high levels of SOE. Similarly, SOE will also moderate the relationship between LMX and POS. Finally, we hypothesize that POS will partially mediate the relationship between LMX and affective commitment. These hypotheses will be tested using the SPSS macro PROCESS, using bootstrap sampling techniques to estimate these effects. Multiple survey timepoints will be used to collect self-report data, with the intent to reduce the effect of common method bias. The predictor and moderator variables will be collected at time one, followed by the mediator, and finally the outcome of affective commitment. This collection method should enable us to make stronger claims as to the direction of these relationships. Our proposed model aims to direct future research on describing these relationships and organizational efforts to increase employees’ affective commitment to the organization, retaining employees in the long term.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS
 
Oct 28th, 10:00 AM Oct 28th, 10:55 AM

Employees that want to stay: How relationships with leader and organization interact to predict affective commitment

Previous research has attempted to explain how Leader-member exchange (LMX) is related to subordinate affective commitment to organizations. Since affective commitment is highly related to employee turnover, understanding the effects supervisors have on affective commitment is of great importance for fostering high-quality relationships within the workplace. While previous research has been conducted on this relationship, past conceptualizations have yet to account for both the moderating effects of supervisor’s organizational embodiment (SOE) in conjunction with the mediating effect of perceived organizational support (POS). The current study proposes a comprehensive moderated mediation model, describing a path that accounts for variability due to employee perceptions of supervisors and organizations alike. The main hypothesis for the proposed study is that SOE will serve as a moderating variable such that the relationship between LMX and affective commitment will be stronger at high levels of SOE. Similarly, SOE will also moderate the relationship between LMX and POS. Finally, we hypothesize that POS will partially mediate the relationship between LMX and affective commitment. These hypotheses will be tested using the SPSS macro PROCESS, using bootstrap sampling techniques to estimate these effects. Multiple survey timepoints will be used to collect self-report data, with the intent to reduce the effect of common method bias. The predictor and moderator variables will be collected at time one, followed by the mediator, and finally the outcome of affective commitment. This collection method should enable us to make stronger claims as to the direction of these relationships. Our proposed model aims to direct future research on describing these relationships and organizational efforts to increase employees’ affective commitment to the organization, retaining employees in the long term.