Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

While learning-by-teaching has been shown to be effective, research in the area lacks a standardization of measurement and manipulations. Meta-analytic evidence has shown that peer tutoring is an effective learning tool for tutors (Cohen, Kulik, & Kulik, 1982); however, these studies do not provide a way of differentiating the effects of explaining versus interacting with the tutees and answering their questions, thus forcing the tutors to identify their own knowledge gaps. Studies that have experimented with the learning-by-teaching method have found that simply preparing to teach can be more effective than other learning techniques, such as only reading or preparing to take a test. However, research has shown that teachers' learning can be inhibited by failing to engage in metacognitive techniques, such as regulating their learning. Teachers also often fail to engage in deep processing of the material, such as analyzing connections and causal relationships and instead tend to summarize or memorize. Consequently, research has noted a need to examine the cognitive mechanisms that are occurring while teaching. Concept mapping can be a useful tool to encourage students to process material in deeper, more meaningful ways. This proposed research is an extension of a study by Fiorella and Mayer (2014) in which participants read an expository text on the Doppler effect and taught the material on video, which allows for an examination of learning-by-teaching without the social interaction that is present in tutoring. The results of this study provided evidence that the effects of learning-by-teaching are strongest when the teacher is also expecting to teach. Therefore, participants in the present study will be informed that they will be teaching. Incorporating concept maps after learning will allow for an examination of the cognitive processing that is taking place while preparing to teach. The present study will examine the main effects of both teaching and concept mapping, as well as the interaction between the two. Additionally, past research has shown that concept mapping tends to better benefit those with lower verbal ability, so the present research will control for this. Determining the mechanisms of the learning-by-teaching paradigm can have great implications for educational settings, as well as for workplace and professional training.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Examining the Learning-by-Teaching Process Through Concept Maps

While learning-by-teaching has been shown to be effective, research in the area lacks a standardization of measurement and manipulations. Meta-analytic evidence has shown that peer tutoring is an effective learning tool for tutors (Cohen, Kulik, & Kulik, 1982); however, these studies do not provide a way of differentiating the effects of explaining versus interacting with the tutees and answering their questions, thus forcing the tutors to identify their own knowledge gaps. Studies that have experimented with the learning-by-teaching method have found that simply preparing to teach can be more effective than other learning techniques, such as only reading or preparing to take a test. However, research has shown that teachers' learning can be inhibited by failing to engage in metacognitive techniques, such as regulating their learning. Teachers also often fail to engage in deep processing of the material, such as analyzing connections and causal relationships and instead tend to summarize or memorize. Consequently, research has noted a need to examine the cognitive mechanisms that are occurring while teaching. Concept mapping can be a useful tool to encourage students to process material in deeper, more meaningful ways. This proposed research is an extension of a study by Fiorella and Mayer (2014) in which participants read an expository text on the Doppler effect and taught the material on video, which allows for an examination of learning-by-teaching without the social interaction that is present in tutoring. The results of this study provided evidence that the effects of learning-by-teaching are strongest when the teacher is also expecting to teach. Therefore, participants in the present study will be informed that they will be teaching. Incorporating concept maps after learning will allow for an examination of the cognitive processing that is taking place while preparing to teach. The present study will examine the main effects of both teaching and concept mapping, as well as the interaction between the two. Additionally, past research has shown that concept mapping tends to better benefit those with lower verbal ability, so the present research will control for this. Determining the mechanisms of the learning-by-teaching paradigm can have great implications for educational settings, as well as for workplace and professional training.