Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Past research has demonstrated individuals’ lack the ability to accurately self-assess their competencies in comparison to external assessments (Davis et al., 2006). Other research has explored various factors that contribute to individuals being able to adequately predict their performance on a task, such as self-concept, prior task experience, and actual task performance (Davis, Fedor, Parsons, & Herold, 2000). The aim of this research is to examine the impact of participation in a flight operations center simulation on individuals’ self-perceptions of their ability to make decisions under stress. Prior to and after participating in three simulations, where teams of senior aerospace students work together to operate a virtual airline, the students will be administered a scale that assesses self-perceptions of decision making under stress. The goal of this project is to examine how feedback on performance, stress, and personal fear of invalidity predict change in self-assessments of decision making under stress after being placed in a high-fidelity simulation experience. This experience may provide individuals with a more accurate picture of their ability to make decisions under stress, which could align future self-assessments and objective measures of performance, as well as aid in designing and using high-fidelity training to prepare individuals for success upon entering the workforce.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Self-assessments of Decision Making Under Stress in a Flight Operations Center Simulation

Past research has demonstrated individuals’ lack the ability to accurately self-assess their competencies in comparison to external assessments (Davis et al., 2006). Other research has explored various factors that contribute to individuals being able to adequately predict their performance on a task, such as self-concept, prior task experience, and actual task performance (Davis, Fedor, Parsons, & Herold, 2000). The aim of this research is to examine the impact of participation in a flight operations center simulation on individuals’ self-perceptions of their ability to make decisions under stress. Prior to and after participating in three simulations, where teams of senior aerospace students work together to operate a virtual airline, the students will be administered a scale that assesses self-perceptions of decision making under stress. The goal of this project is to examine how feedback on performance, stress, and personal fear of invalidity predict change in self-assessments of decision making under stress after being placed in a high-fidelity simulation experience. This experience may provide individuals with a more accurate picture of their ability to make decisions under stress, which could align future self-assessments and objective measures of performance, as well as aid in designing and using high-fidelity training to prepare individuals for success upon entering the workforce.