Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

A learning organization has been addressed as a key organizational culture in the current fast-paced global market. However, despite the attention, there was no commonly accepted single model of the learning organization. In this study, recently discussed two alternative models for learning organization and performance were compared in terms of theoretical as well as statistical approaches. One question from the alternatives was related with the dimensionality of learning organization. General one-factor model and two sub-factor models for learning organization were compared. Another question was about financial and knowledge performance which are functioning as a final endogenous variable or a mediator. In order to examine the questions, variance and covariance matrix dataset (n = 416) from Kim, Watkins, and Lu’s (2017) was used. Referring other previous studies such as Yang, Watkins, and Marsick (2004), Pokharel and Choi (2013), or McHargue (2003), I have drawn a few more mathematically equivalent models of the learning organization, and the models were tested using the same data for the first analysis. In general, it was found that either knowledge performance or financial performance could be a mediator, or both could be outcome variables; however, the fit of each model was the same (χ2 = 108.62, df=26, GFI = .939, TLI = .941, CFI = .958, RMSEA = .088). For the dimensionality issue for learning organization, general one-factor model was supported due to the high correlation between two sub-factors (r = .94). Therefore, it was concluded that the learning organization culture would directly affect knowledge performance and financial performance, respectively, and all the seven dimensions of a learning organization should not have any hierarchical sub-groups. Bearing in mind the conclusion and the parsimonious rule, a new model was proposed. This study would contribute to informing organizations what to focus on, when considering the culture of a learning organization. Lastly, the need of further empirical research would be pointed out as a limitation of this study.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Oct 28th, 10:00 AM Oct 28th, 10:55 AM

Learning Organization, its Relationship with Knowledge Performance and Financial Performance

A learning organization has been addressed as a key organizational culture in the current fast-paced global market. However, despite the attention, there was no commonly accepted single model of the learning organization. In this study, recently discussed two alternative models for learning organization and performance were compared in terms of theoretical as well as statistical approaches. One question from the alternatives was related with the dimensionality of learning organization. General one-factor model and two sub-factor models for learning organization were compared. Another question was about financial and knowledge performance which are functioning as a final endogenous variable or a mediator. In order to examine the questions, variance and covariance matrix dataset (n = 416) from Kim, Watkins, and Lu’s (2017) was used. Referring other previous studies such as Yang, Watkins, and Marsick (2004), Pokharel and Choi (2013), or McHargue (2003), I have drawn a few more mathematically equivalent models of the learning organization, and the models were tested using the same data for the first analysis. In general, it was found that either knowledge performance or financial performance could be a mediator, or both could be outcome variables; however, the fit of each model was the same (χ2 = 108.62, df=26, GFI = .939, TLI = .941, CFI = .958, RMSEA = .088). For the dimensionality issue for learning organization, general one-factor model was supported due to the high correlation between two sub-factors (r = .94). Therefore, it was concluded that the learning organization culture would directly affect knowledge performance and financial performance, respectively, and all the seven dimensions of a learning organization should not have any hierarchical sub-groups. Bearing in mind the conclusion and the parsimonious rule, a new model was proposed. This study would contribute to informing organizations what to focus on, when considering the culture of a learning organization. Lastly, the need of further empirical research would be pointed out as a limitation of this study.