Committee Chair

Hensley, Christopher

Committee Member

Garland, Tammy; McGuffee, Karen

Department

Dept. of Criminal Justice and Legal Assistant Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Few studies have examined how animal cruelty can be a learned behavior. Using data collected from 257 male inmates at a Southern state medium-security prison, the current study seeks to replicate the Hensley, Tallichet and Dutkiewicz (2012) study. It examines the potential for the onset and recurrence of childhood animal cruelty to become a learned behavior, specifically in terms of how demographic characteristics and childhood experiences, such as witnessing animal cruelty and being mentally and/or physically abused, influence such behavior. In the current study, those who were physically abused as children reported engaging in recurrent animal cruelty. Those who reported witnessing animal cruelty at a younger age also reported engaging in animal cruelty at an earlier age. Respondents who reported witnessing a parent commit acts of animal abuse reported that they committed animal abuse themselves at an older age, while those who witnessed a brother/sister commit animal abuse reported engaging in it at an earlier age.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2014

Subject

Violence in children; Animal welfare -- Psychological aspects; Children and animals; Conduct disorders in children -- Risk factors; Human-animal relationships

Keyword

Animal cruelty; Childhood animal cruelty; Social learning

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

vii, 30 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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