Committee Chair

Ross, David F.

Committee Member

Warren, Amye R.; O'Leary, Brian J.; Elwell, Jeffery; Walker, Randy

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Unconscious transference occurs when a witness misidentifies a familiar but innocent person from a lineup. In Ross, Atkinson, Rosenberg, Pica, and Pozullo (2014), the use of a sequential lineup procedure, in which faces are presented one at a time, drastically reduced the unconscious transference error, but at the cost of also reducing the rate of correct identifications. However, in that study, the participants were not told how many faces they would view in the sequential lineup. In the present study, participants viewed a video of a staged crime that did or did not contain a bystander who looked similar to the thief, then subsequently viewed a lineup with either the thief or the bystander in it. Knowing the correct number of faces to be seen reinstated the unconscious transference effect with no corresponding increase in the rate of correct identifications. Other findings and policy implications are discussed.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2014

Subject

Transference (Psychology); Eyewitness identification; Recollection (Psychology); Visual perception

Keyword

Unconscious; Transference; Lineup; Backloading; Bystander; Sequential

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

ix, 56 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS