Committee Chair

Buggey, Tom J.

Committee Member

McWilliam, Robin A.; Wingate, Kim

Department

Dept. of Education

College

College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Video self-modeling (VSM) has been used successfully to teach play and communication skills to children with autism over age 4. Research has demonstrated a need to evaluate the effectiveness of VSM with younger children, as well as to assess which types of behaviors/skills can be taught through VSM. Two videos were recorded and edited to demonstrate a three year old child with developmental delay (at risk for ADHD) performing tasks during play and meals with the goal of teaching him to roll a ball and sit in his chair for longer at family meals. Parents were responsible for implementing the VSM intervention as well as collecting data through video (with the author's support). Results demonstrated that VSM might have been successful to teach the child to take turns with his sister in ball play but did not consistently increase the amount of time he would sit in his chair during meals. Implications for practice of this intervention and need for further research with very young children are also discussed.

Degree

M. Ed.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Education.

Date

5-2014

Subject

Early childhood education -- Activity programs; Children with disabilities -- Education (Early childhood)

Keyword

Video self-modeling; Teach play skills young children disabilities; teach adaptive skills young children disabilities

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

vi, 28 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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