Committee Chair

Baker, Sybil

Committee Member

Balazs, Thomas; Ventura, Abbie

Department

Dept. of English

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The question of genre may be unimportant when writing or reading fiction, but the marketplace continues to draw those dividing lines. Moreover, there are tropes and techniques to be learned from each discrete genre of fiction. The creative portion of this thesis consists of the first four chapters of Brian Beise’s novel, Brawn. The introductory essay discusses the divisions of literary and genre fiction, and describes how borrowing elements from various genres informed the writing of Brawn.

Acknowledgments

I thank Rick Jackson for teaching me about images. I thank Sybil Baker for teaching me about scenes, and for taking seriously such a crazy novel. I thank Tom Balázs and Abbie Ventura for serving on my thesis committee and for their valuable input. Lastly, I thank Joyce Smith for her help and support throughout my time in this program.

Degree

M. A.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Arts.

Date

12-2014

Subject

American fiction

Keyword

novel, fiction, creative writing, criticism

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

vii, 75 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Date Available

1-1-2016

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