Committee Chair

Weathington, Bart L.

Committee Member

Biderman, Michael D.; Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The present study evaluated the relationship between perceived stress and psychological well-being moderated by physical activity in college-age participants. Previous research suggests physical activity relates to lower stress levels (Nguyen‐Michel, Unger, Hamilton, & Spruijt‐Metz, 2006). Additionally, research has found physical activity is connected with overall well-being and lower levels of mental health issues. The results from an online survey collection (n=291) suggest that physical activity, at least as operationalized in the study, does not moderate the relationship between perceived stress and psychological well-being. However, perceived stress does have a significant relationship with psychological well-being. Also, the motive for physical activity, interest and enjoyment is a significant predictor of physical activity. But, fitness as a motive for physical activity is not a significant predictor of physical activity. Conscientiousness does not significantly affect the relationship with physical activity. Students who display positive affect are more likely to participate in physical activity.

Acknowledgments

I would like to acknowledge my thesis committee – Dr. Bart Weathington, Dr. Chris Cunningham, and Dr. Michael Biderman for an ample amount of support and expertise throughout the duration of this project. Dr. Cunningham provided helpful and insightful feedback. Dr. Biderman provided great statistical support. And, my thesis chair, Dr. Bart Weathington, who was always on board with my ideas. Thank you, for your dedication and support towards this project and my I-O professional development.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2015

Subject

College students -- Health and hygiene; College students -- Psychology; Stress (Physiology)

Keyword

stress; physical activity; psychological well-being; college students

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

ix, 79 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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