Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Committee Member

Weathington, Bart; Metzger, Richard

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The medical resident population is especially likely to experience burnout and other negative health-related consequences due to the workplace stressors they encounter. A primary purpose of the present study was to provide insight into the stress and recovery challenges faced by medical residents in a typical hospital environment. Thirty-eight participants provided rich quantitative and qualitative data regarding their daily work and non-work time usage, recovery practices, and needs. Results showed that medical residents report (on average) longer working hours, less leisure time, and shorter amounts of sleep when compared with the average working American. A detailed assessment of time usage showed that medical residents do not participate in many resource replenishing activities while at work, and when out of work, tend to participate in more passive than active forms of recovery. The present results provide rich information that can aid in the creation of a more occupation-specific model of workplace stress and recovery practices for medical residents and workers in other occupations.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2012

Subject

Residents (Medicine); Stress (Psychology)

Keyword

Medical residents; Workplace stress

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology | Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

xi, 87 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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