Committee Chair

Weathington, Bart L.

Committee Member

Johnson, Michael B.; Ross, David F.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Cycling is an endurance sport defined by races that require long intensive efforts. In this atmosphere, athletes who experience a self-proclaimed “bad day” may be inclined to drop out of a competition instead of complete it. Previous research has shown that male athletes demonstrated higher levels of ego orientation and extrinsic motivation while female athletes demonstrated higher levels of goal orientation and intrinsic motivation (White & Duda, 1994). The current study examines the relationship of gender, goal orientation and participation motivation to in-competition drop-out rates among competitive cyclists. Specifically, it was hypothesized that the decision to prematurely drop out of a race is influenced by an athlete’s goal orientation (ego or task) and their intrinsic and/or extrinsic motivations for participating. Results demonstrated higher in-competition drop-out rates among male cyclists than that of female cyclists. Completion rates were also assessed in relation to goal orientation and participation motivation and demonstrated lower levels of ego orientation, higher levels of task orientation, and higher levels of intrinsic motivation among female cyclists in comparison to male cyclists.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2012

Subject

Motivation (Psychology)

Keyword

Goal orientation; Participation motivation

Discipline

Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 58 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Included in

Psychology Commons

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