Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Organizations are increasingly becoming aware of the importance of fostering a healthy workforce. Health promotion programs, wellness programs that address a range of health-related behaviors, can be very beneficial for both employees and organizations, but only if the employees use them. Although corporations are offering such programs to employees, many individuals choose not to participate. The reasons for this non-participation are not yet fully understood, especially from a psychological perspective. The present study examined the relationship between perceived barriers to exercise and participation in a health promotion program, and the influence of self-efficacy and Five Factor Model personality traits on this relationship. It was proposed that personality would influence the perception of barriers to exercise and self-efficacy would moderate the relationship between barriers and participation. Hierarchical regression and multiple mediation analyses were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the relationships between personality, barriers, self-efficacy, and exercise-related outcomes. Results showed little support for the hypotheses but did allow for the expansion of knowledge in this particular area of research on exercise and health-related behaviors.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

8-2009

Subject

Health promotion; Quality of work life -- United States

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

iv, 52 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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