Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The modern work environment is characterized by continuous changes involving mergers, acquisitions, downsizing, and organizational restructuring. To persevere in this context, employees are now implicitly required to demonstrate more proactivity when carrying out their job functions. Although proactive work behaviors seem to predict career and organizational achievement, relatively little research has examined the underlying process that stimulates such behaviors in employees. The present research addressed this gap by testing the hypothesis that the positive relationship between successful completion of an outdoor adventure training (OA) program and future proactive work behaviors is mediated by a person’s self-efficacy. Two studies were conducted; Study 1 was cross-sectional and retrospective in nature while Study 2 used a repeated measures design to draw causal inferences. Both studies showed partial support for the proposed hypothesis.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

8-2009

Subject

Self-efficacy -- Effect of outdoor recreation on; Recreational therapy

Discipline

Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

v, 53 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Included in

Psychology Commons

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