Committee Chair

Beech, Jennifer

Committee Member

Palmer, Heather; Jones, Rebecca

Department

Dept. of English

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

This paper concerns the idea of voice within the field of composition studies and more specifically the canon of style. I examine the current rise of style to a place of prominence within composition and take issue with the exclusion of voice from this resurgence. By looking more closely at the complex definitions surrounding voice as well as the associations and critiques which have worked to repress its contemporary discussion, I demonstrate the unfounded nature of its dismissal. After revealing the ways in which voice is compatible with postmodern thought and usable despite its complexity, I outline some of the pedagogical implications a renewed acceptance of voice would allow. These include a more complete rhetorical vocabulary, a deeper understanding of ethos as it functions in student writing and our increasingly globalized electronic society, and its importance to the field of alternative discourse.

Degree

M. A.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Arts.

Date

5-2010

Subject

Voice in literature

Discipline

English Language and Literature

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

iii, 69 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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