Committee Chair

Harris, Billy

Committee Member

Kizza, Joseph; Thompson, Jack

Department

Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Communication is faster than ever. Innovations in low cost network computing have brought an era in which people can effortlessly and instantaneously view and post opinions collaboratively with others across the world. With such an infrastructure of public message boards, chat rooms and instant messaging systems, there is also a large potential for abuse by people wishing to capitalize on such open services by posting unsolicited advertisements. An entire industry has been constructed around the prevention of unsolicited electronic advertisements (SPAM). This thesis examines various techniques for preventing SPAM, focusing on Completely Automated Public Turing Tests to Tell Computers and Humans Apart (CAPTCHA), a challenge/response technique where an image is displayed with text that is heavily distorted. It also examines the feasibility of breaking CAPTCHA programmatically, alternatives to CAPTCHA based on filtering, improvements to CAPTCHA using photo recognition and avoiding the need for CAPTCHA using naïve approaches.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2009

Subject

CAPTCHA (Challenge-response test) -- Evaluation; Internet Security measures

Discipline

Computer Sciences

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 92 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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