Committee Chair

Hood, Ralph W.

Committee Member

Metzger, Richard; Eames, Kevin

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

While religious involvement, particularly intrinsic religiosity or spirituality, has shown a significant inverse relationship with depression, this relationship is complex and multifaceted and several decades of study have yet to reveal a clear pattern. This work is a survey of the current research on the etiology and symptomology of depression and its interaction with spirituality. This work is testing a new model that views the effects of depression on spirituality as a function of an individual’s perceived relationship with God. A survey was distributed to a sample of 135 evangelical Christians. Depressed persons made up approximately 16% of the sample. An independent samples t-test demonstrated that depressed persons had significantly lower scores of spirituality than non-depressed persons. Depressed persons were more likely to indicate that they felt unloved by God or angry at God, indicators of relational disruptions similar to patterns seen in interpersonal relationships of those with depression.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2012

Subject

Depression; Mental; Evangelism

Keyword

Depression; Evangelical Christianity

Discipline

Medicine and Health Sciences | Psychiatry and Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

xiii, 55 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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