Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Committee Member

Rogers, Kate; O'Leary, Brian J.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of socializing, or activities that are characterized by social interaction, on recovery from work stress. Drawing from consistent findings in personality research, we hypothesized that individuals who measure high in extraversion receive the greatest recovery benefits from socializing, and that this relationship is mediated by state positive affect. An online assessment was administered to 238 participants to measure trait extraversion, trait and state affect, and factors related to their social activities across two recent time periods. Hypotheses were tested using correlational and regression-based techniques. The findings provide support for a relationship between state positive affect and recovery from work stress. Contribution during social activities (i.e. acting extraverted) predicted state positive affect while controlling for trait extraversion.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2016

Subject

Stress management; Work-life balance; Work -- Psychological aspects

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

viii, 59 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS