Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Committee Member

Biderman, Michael D.; Ross, David

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The present study investigated a conditional model of dispositional and situational variables to predict academic procrastination and academic achievement. Traditional predictive models focus on personality traits, specifically conscientiousness and neuroticism. The dispositional variables of interest in the present study were self-regard, frustration intolerance, grit, and goal orientation. The situational variables were course/task self-efficacy, boredom, and task value. It was hypothesized that self-regard, frustration intolerance, grit, and goal orientation would each be associated with self-efficacy, boredom, task value, academic procrastination and academic achievement and that the conditional model would more strongly predict both academic procrastination and academic achievement than personality traits alone. The results from online survey collection (N = 206) strongly indicate that individual differences in belief-related dispositional and situational factors significantly improve traditional predictive models of academic procrastination and achievement. Future research should consider utilizing conditional models which incorporate these factors.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2016

Subject

Procrastination -- Psychological aspects; Prediction of scholastic success

Keyword

academic procrastination; self-worth; frustration; grit

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

xi, 75 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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