Committee Chair

Hood, Ralph W., Jr.

Committee Member

Watson, Paul; Silver, Christopher F.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Muslims are from unique nationalities and ethnicities, leaving their motherland for various reasons while little is known about their acculturation. Due to constant desecration of Islam, integration remains challenging for Muslim immigrants due to extreme prejudice. Due to the complexity of Islamic identity coupled with challenges of enculturation, this study (n=390) explored through online questionnaires the generational differences of identity, psychological well-being, personality, perceived prejudice and acculturation of 1st -4th generation Muslim immigrants in the U.S. who self-identified as spiritual or religious. Distinction of religious or spiritual identity was not found among Muslim immigrants. First generation religious Muslims scored higher on psychological well-being. Further, results explored other individual differences among Muslims amid the extreme prejudice they face currently from host societies and future research complications with exploring Muslim immigrants.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

8-2016

Subject

Muslims -- Cultural assimilation -- United States; Emigration and immigration -- Religious aspects

Keyword

Islam; Acculturation; Well-being, Religion; Muslim immigrants

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

xviii, 120 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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