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Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

This exploratory study examined issues parents (n=20) experienced after adoption through the child welfare system. The findings suggest that the primary differences between struggling and non-struggling families was whether the family was internally-protected or externally-focused. Internally-protected families were able to insulate and protect their family from many outside forces and meet their children’s needs. In contrast, externally-influenced families tended to have negative involvement with the school, community, and/or law enforcement, often resulting from children’s disruptive behavior. The parents had limited choices as to whether outside entities were involved in their children’s lives. Participants reported that sustained support after adoption is necessary so parents do not burn out, and that different resources are needed based on the child’s current age.

Cover Page Footnote

The authors would like to thank the study participants and Jockey Being Family™ Backpack Program staff for their participation in this study. We would also like to acknowledge the Coalition for Children, Youth and Families for partial funding of this study.

Keyword

universal intervention, adoption, post-permanence, resources, foster care

Discipline

Social Work

Document Type

Article

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

Included in

Social Work Commons

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