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Modern Psychological Studies

Volume

24

Number

1

Department

Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Terror Management Theory has been applied with judges and juries in the courtroom, but not yet with criminals themselves. The current study looks for an association between criminogenic thought patterns and worldviews of criminal behavior. Thought patterns were assessed with the Measure of Criminogenic Thinking Styles (MOCTS), while worldviews were measured with the associate section of the Measures of Criminal Attitudes and Associates. Results indicated that mortality salience did not increase criminogenic thinking. However, criminogenic thinking scores from the MOCTS were correlated with scores on the associate scale under mortality salience. These findings may suggest that participants with a worldview of criminal behavior resort to their worldview with complementarily high levels of criminogenic thinking following anxiety from a mortality salience.

Keyword

terror management theory; criminogenic thinking

Document Type

Article

Language

English

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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