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Modern Psychological Studies

Volume

27

Number

1

Department

Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Date

2021

Abstract

The present study investigated the relationship between a person’s emotional state and interpersonal coordination. Researchers primed fifty-one participants to either be angry or happy through a writing prompt. Participants did an arm curl activity while watching a video-taped confederate doing arm curls at a set pace with a congruent or incongruent emotion. The participants were told that this video was a projected live stream. Finally, participants completed measures of post-activity emotions and rapport with and likeability toward the confederate. Our experimental design included an independent samples t-tests to examine the effect of congruency on interpersonal coordination, post-activities, and rapport with the confederate, and one-way ANOVAs to understand the effect of the conditions on interpersonal coordination, post-activity emotions, confederate likeability, and confederate rapport. There was no significant main effect difference of conditions on level of coordination and no significant difference of congruency on coordination. There was a significant effect for condition on sadness and a trending effect on anger and disgust, such that having an angry primed emotion and seeing an angry confederate resulted in higher negative emotions. There was a significant effect of congruency on anger, meaning that those that had incongruent primed emotions to the confederate had increased anger compared to those with congruent emotions. There was no significant difference between conditions or congruency for likeability measures; however, there was a significant difference of condition on rapport ratings, with participants who were primed happy and saw the happy confederate or were primed angry and saw the happy confederate had higher rapport ratings with the confederate compared to any other conditions. Therefore, the results suggest that there is a complex relationship between emotion and interpersonal coordination.

Keyword

Interpersonal; coordination; emotion; rapport; likeability

Discipline

Psychology

Document Type

articles

DCMI Type

Text

Language

English

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/

Included in

Psychology Commons

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