Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The #metoo movement has spurred women and men to come forward with their stories and claims of sexual harassment. In addition to older adults, young adults have experienced sexual harassment in a variety of settings. These may include school, work, or even on the street. Around 51% of women and 53% of men had experienced some form of unwanted sexually charged interaction in public places, like cat-calling, by the age of 17 (Kearl, 2014). The purpose of the study is to examine how young adults perceive sexually harassing behaviors at work. I examine how these perceptions are influenced by one’s individual work centrality beliefs, parent’s work centrality beliefs, and social support. Participants will be recruited from MTSU’s student population to take an online survey asking them to rate their work centrality beliefs, their perceptions of their parent’s work centrality beliefs, and their perceptions of family support received. Individuals will also be rating their perceptions of sexually harassing behaviors, if they have experienced the behavior, and the frequency of experiencing the behavior. To analyze these perceptions, a series of multiple regressions will be conducted.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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How do individual and parental work centrality attitudes and social support impact young adults’ perceptions of sexual harassment at work?

The #metoo movement has spurred women and men to come forward with their stories and claims of sexual harassment. In addition to older adults, young adults have experienced sexual harassment in a variety of settings. These may include school, work, or even on the street. Around 51% of women and 53% of men had experienced some form of unwanted sexually charged interaction in public places, like cat-calling, by the age of 17 (Kearl, 2014). The purpose of the study is to examine how young adults perceive sexually harassing behaviors at work. I examine how these perceptions are influenced by one’s individual work centrality beliefs, parent’s work centrality beliefs, and social support. Participants will be recruited from MTSU’s student population to take an online survey asking them to rate their work centrality beliefs, their perceptions of their parent’s work centrality beliefs, and their perceptions of family support received. Individuals will also be rating their perceptions of sexually harassing behaviors, if they have experienced the behavior, and the frequency of experiencing the behavior. To analyze these perceptions, a series of multiple regressions will be conducted.