Title

Dysfunctional Retention: The Case of Abused Worker Syndrome

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Extending work from the realm of counseling psychology into the work environment, we examine the workplace complement of “battered person/spouse syndrome” in which workers stay with the organization despite experiencing abuse. We define this abused worker syndrome (AWS) as an association of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-type symptoms and other symptoms (e.g., anxiety, depression, low self-esteem), resulting from aversive incidents of psychological (i.e., non-physical) abuse at work. Our presentation will examine the contextual, relational, and individual antecedents of AWS, the psychological processes underlying targets staying, along with the associated workplace outcomes experienced by the targeted worker. We contribute a conceptual model and research propositions to explain why and when AWS occurs, and we identify implications for researchers to explore this line of inquiry and for organizations to prevent and mitigate AWS. Specifically related to the SHRM BoCK representation, we will discuss how various types of communication can lead to AWS, relationship management to avoid those types of communication, and the ethical practices leadership should follow to negate instances which may lead to AWS.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

presentations

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 27th, 1:30 PM Oct 27th, 2:30 PM

Dysfunctional Retention: The Case of Abused Worker Syndrome

Extending work from the realm of counseling psychology into the work environment, we examine the workplace complement of “battered person/spouse syndrome” in which workers stay with the organization despite experiencing abuse. We define this abused worker syndrome (AWS) as an association of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-type symptoms and other symptoms (e.g., anxiety, depression, low self-esteem), resulting from aversive incidents of psychological (i.e., non-physical) abuse at work. Our presentation will examine the contextual, relational, and individual antecedents of AWS, the psychological processes underlying targets staying, along with the associated workplace outcomes experienced by the targeted worker. We contribute a conceptual model and research propositions to explain why and when AWS occurs, and we identify implications for researchers to explore this line of inquiry and for organizations to prevent and mitigate AWS. Specifically related to the SHRM BoCK representation, we will discuss how various types of communication can lead to AWS, relationship management to avoid those types of communication, and the ethical practices leadership should follow to negate instances which may lead to AWS.