Day 1, April 14 - Presentations

Title

Women in the church (Middle Ages)

Start Date

14-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

14-4-2020 11:00 AM

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Chattanooga State undergraduate researchers present current research projects: This project focuses on the women in the church during the Middle Ages, what their role and purpose was to the Catholic Church. During this period of time, the main strategy of a woman becoming a saint was asceticism. Asceticism worked in a way of martyrdom through the practices of fasting and chastity. During this time women were seen as inferior to men, but in the eyes of the church the way they could make up for it was living an ascetic life. A big part of this is to remain a virgin, metaphorically the church’s bride. The rise of these female saints’ lives continued to grow in the church and through society, setting a standard for sainthood. In England, this way of life also gave a rise to convents so that these women could live together and embrace the ascetic lifestyle. The women who became saints were not granted sainthood until after their death. During the middle ages there was a rise of female, virgin martyrs. There is controversy as to why there was the rise of virgin martyrs. One side mentions the concern of how often this type of saint comes about, a man trying to seduce a young, untouched woman, being subjected to violence specifically from men ending with the woman’s death. The concern was that it could be said that there was some type of justification of treatment towards women if they ended becoming saints. The other side says that these women became saints because they were strong women, who did not bow down or give up their beliefs even if it meant they would die in the end. Another aspect that impacted women in society during that time was the Virgin Mary, giving into the idea that women did not have to marry to confirm her identity. Focusing on a couple of saints during this time is Saint Hilda of Whitby. Her life started out by being raised in the Catholic faith. She was considered to be highly educated for a female during that time. Because of her education and experience, she was sought out by any and all types of people. She lived in and took care of the large estate of Whitby. During that time that area there was a vote to determine if Catholicism would be allowed in Britain. Even though the vote ended in against the church, Hilda stuck by the church’s side and encouraged people to seek Catholicism. Julian of Norwich was a Christian writer during the middle ages around mid to late 14th century. Her focus on the church was mainly about her interpretation of the Holy Trinity, how God can play the role of being a divine being and also being human. She spent her life without being married due to her not needing that role to be played for herself. She devoted her life to prayer and lived in a cell that was a part of the St. Julian Church in Norwich.

Date

4-14-2020

Document Type

presentations

Language

English

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

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Apr 14th, 9:00 AM Apr 14th, 11:00 AM

Women in the church (Middle Ages)

Chattanooga State undergraduate researchers present current research projects: This project focuses on the women in the church during the Middle Ages, what their role and purpose was to the Catholic Church. During this period of time, the main strategy of a woman becoming a saint was asceticism. Asceticism worked in a way of martyrdom through the practices of fasting and chastity. During this time women were seen as inferior to men, but in the eyes of the church the way they could make up for it was living an ascetic life. A big part of this is to remain a virgin, metaphorically the church’s bride. The rise of these female saints’ lives continued to grow in the church and through society, setting a standard for sainthood. In England, this way of life also gave a rise to convents so that these women could live together and embrace the ascetic lifestyle. The women who became saints were not granted sainthood until after their death. During the middle ages there was a rise of female, virgin martyrs. There is controversy as to why there was the rise of virgin martyrs. One side mentions the concern of how often this type of saint comes about, a man trying to seduce a young, untouched woman, being subjected to violence specifically from men ending with the woman’s death. The concern was that it could be said that there was some type of justification of treatment towards women if they ended becoming saints. The other side says that these women became saints because they were strong women, who did not bow down or give up their beliefs even if it meant they would die in the end. Another aspect that impacted women in society during that time was the Virgin Mary, giving into the idea that women did not have to marry to confirm her identity. Focusing on a couple of saints during this time is Saint Hilda of Whitby. Her life started out by being raised in the Catholic faith. She was considered to be highly educated for a female during that time. Because of her education and experience, she was sought out by any and all types of people. She lived in and took care of the large estate of Whitby. During that time that area there was a vote to determine if Catholicism would be allowed in Britain. Even though the vote ended in against the church, Hilda stuck by the church’s side and encouraged people to seek Catholicism. Julian of Norwich was a Christian writer during the middle ages around mid to late 14th century. Her focus on the church was mainly about her interpretation of the Holy Trinity, how God can play the role of being a divine being and also being human. She spent her life without being married due to her not needing that role to be played for herself. She devoted her life to prayer and lived in a cell that was a part of the St. Julian Church in Norwich.