Project Director

Garland, Tammy

Department Examiner

McGuffee, Karen; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Weathington, Bart

Department

Dept. of Criminal Justice and Legal Assistant Studies

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

This study examines the individual responses of bystanders to bullying based on situational and personal variables. Using self-report data collected on 935 university students, these variables were used to determine if there was a relationship between the variables and the decision to intervene in a bullying situation for a friend. The results suggested that race, sexual orientation, and direct forms of bullying (physical and cyber bullying) have a relationship between an individual’s choice to intervene in a bullying situation for a friend. The findings failed to support the hypothesis that personal factors such as gender, socio-economic status, and a history of being a bully and/or victim had an effect in the individual choice to intervene.

Degree

B. S.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Date

12-2014

Subject

Bullying in schools -- United States; Cyberbullying -- United States

Keyword

Bystanders; Bullying; Cyber bullying; Physical bullying; Individual responses to bullying

Discipline

Higher Education | Legal Studies

Document Type

Theses

Extent

35 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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