Title

Who is more creative? Assessing the role that individual characteristics play in their relationship with creativity in various domains

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The relationship between artistic domains (such as music, painting, dancing, etc.) and creativity is not a novel idea. There is even a sector found within education and business called creative arts, which is composed of these domains, and the label of “creative” implies there is a degree of creativity involved in the work. However, researchers have yet to identify the exact relationship between creativity and artistic domains. This study seeks to shed light on the relationship that exists between artistic domains and creativity in regards to expertise, novel production, generalizability, and personality. The artistic domains in question include music, visual arts, creative writing, and dance. Additional domains under investigation include soccer and softball/baseball. Sovansky et al. (2016) define expertise as an individual who has extensive knowledge or skills within a certain domain due to lengthy training. All of this training leads to a high degree of knowledge, an enhanced ability to organize this knowledge, and better performance. However, an expert with a specific knowledge set may find it difficult to look at a problem from a broad standpoint and come up with multiple solutions if their knowledge base does not contain a possible answer to the problem (Wiley, 1998). Therefore, an expert may become fixated in solving a problem using only the knowledge they know well. Sovansky et al. (2016) revealed that only expert musicians who create music (i.e., compose, arrange, improvise) had increased divergent thinking compared to expert musicians who simply play music, novices, and non-musicians. This indicates that not every form of music training will be linked to creativity. For this study, participants from the MTSU Psychology Research Pool will complete a survey that is made up of three components: a portion of the HEXACO-PI-R, a Biodata Questionnaire, and a creativity measure. The biodata questionnaire will ask about involvement in music, visual arts, creative writing, dance, soccer, and softball/baseball. Qualtrics will score the responses to the Biodata Questionnaire to determine which images they will see for the Alternative Uses Task. For this task, participants will see pictures of items one at a time and be asked to list as many creativity and practical uses for the item within two minutes. Participant responses will be scored on fluency, flexibility, and originality. Once the data has been collected, the researcher will primarily use regression analyses to answer the research questions.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Who is more creative? Assessing the role that individual characteristics play in their relationship with creativity in various domains

The relationship between artistic domains (such as music, painting, dancing, etc.) and creativity is not a novel idea. There is even a sector found within education and business called creative arts, which is composed of these domains, and the label of “creative” implies there is a degree of creativity involved in the work. However, researchers have yet to identify the exact relationship between creativity and artistic domains. This study seeks to shed light on the relationship that exists between artistic domains and creativity in regards to expertise, novel production, generalizability, and personality. The artistic domains in question include music, visual arts, creative writing, and dance. Additional domains under investigation include soccer and softball/baseball. Sovansky et al. (2016) define expertise as an individual who has extensive knowledge or skills within a certain domain due to lengthy training. All of this training leads to a high degree of knowledge, an enhanced ability to organize this knowledge, and better performance. However, an expert with a specific knowledge set may find it difficult to look at a problem from a broad standpoint and come up with multiple solutions if their knowledge base does not contain a possible answer to the problem (Wiley, 1998). Therefore, an expert may become fixated in solving a problem using only the knowledge they know well. Sovansky et al. (2016) revealed that only expert musicians who create music (i.e., compose, arrange, improvise) had increased divergent thinking compared to expert musicians who simply play music, novices, and non-musicians. This indicates that not every form of music training will be linked to creativity. For this study, participants from the MTSU Psychology Research Pool will complete a survey that is made up of three components: a portion of the HEXACO-PI-R, a Biodata Questionnaire, and a creativity measure. The biodata questionnaire will ask about involvement in music, visual arts, creative writing, dance, soccer, and softball/baseball. Qualtrics will score the responses to the Biodata Questionnaire to determine which images they will see for the Alternative Uses Task. For this task, participants will see pictures of items one at a time and be asked to list as many creativity and practical uses for the item within two minutes. Participant responses will be scored on fluency, flexibility, and originality. Once the data has been collected, the researcher will primarily use regression analyses to answer the research questions.