Title

Organizational justice as a mediator between job insecurity and its predictors

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Job insecurity has gained much empirical focus since Greenhalgh and Rosenblatt’s seminal article (1984), which defined job insecurity as the perceived threat of job loss and the powerlessness to counteract that threat. Research related to job insecurity, including its potential predictors and theories possibly related to the construct, has since proliferated. Psychological contract theory (i.e., perceived contract breach) provides an initial understanding of how these predictors may lead to job insecurity, but more is needed to better understand the mechanisms through which one experiences this perceived threat. More specifically, violations to the psychological contract are a form of injustice (Shore & Tetrick, 1994) and as such, we posit that job insecurity is mediated by organizational justice. Using Amazon’s MechanicalTurk, U.S., English-speaking workers will be recruited to complete brief established measures of job security (Probst, 2003), role conflict and role ambiguity (Rizzo, House, & Lirtzman, 1970), organizational change (Baillien & De Witte, 2009), organizational justice (adapted from Niehoff & Moorman, 1993), work locus of control (Spector, 1988), and organizational communication (adapted from Roberts & O’Reily, 1974). An instructional manipulation check will be used to counteract potential issues of data quality using crowdsourced participants and study fatigue. The data acquired will be used to test six hypotheses, based on three proposed mediation models: 1) organizational justice mediates the relationship between organizational change and job insecurity, with work locus of control and employment type as moderators, 2) organizational justice mediates the relationship between role stressors (conflict and ambiguity) and job insecurity, and 3) organizational justice mediates the relationship between organizational communication and job insecurity.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Organizational justice as a mediator between job insecurity and its predictors

Job insecurity has gained much empirical focus since Greenhalgh and Rosenblatt’s seminal article (1984), which defined job insecurity as the perceived threat of job loss and the powerlessness to counteract that threat. Research related to job insecurity, including its potential predictors and theories possibly related to the construct, has since proliferated. Psychological contract theory (i.e., perceived contract breach) provides an initial understanding of how these predictors may lead to job insecurity, but more is needed to better understand the mechanisms through which one experiences this perceived threat. More specifically, violations to the psychological contract are a form of injustice (Shore & Tetrick, 1994) and as such, we posit that job insecurity is mediated by organizational justice. Using Amazon’s MechanicalTurk, U.S., English-speaking workers will be recruited to complete brief established measures of job security (Probst, 2003), role conflict and role ambiguity (Rizzo, House, & Lirtzman, 1970), organizational change (Baillien & De Witte, 2009), organizational justice (adapted from Niehoff & Moorman, 1993), work locus of control (Spector, 1988), and organizational communication (adapted from Roberts & O’Reily, 1974). An instructional manipulation check will be used to counteract potential issues of data quality using crowdsourced participants and study fatigue. The data acquired will be used to test six hypotheses, based on three proposed mediation models: 1) organizational justice mediates the relationship between organizational change and job insecurity, with work locus of control and employment type as moderators, 2) organizational justice mediates the relationship between role stressors (conflict and ambiguity) and job insecurity, and 3) organizational justice mediates the relationship between organizational communication and job insecurity.