Title

Can interviews predict an employee's length of employment to a company?

Presenter Information

Julia Kentner, Bellarmine University

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

High turnover rates can be detrimental to a company, as they are costly and time consuming and it is extremely expensive to hire and train employees (Gilbertson, 1998). Research has found that individuals who experience higher job satisfaction are less likely to leave their jobs, as they reported higher levels of organizational support (Leider, Harper, Shon, Sellers & Castrucci, 2016). The current study investigated the extent to which a non-profit organization effectively utilized an interview procedure to predict length of employment at the organization. The organization’s interview process was designed to measure potential job satisfaction, person-organization fit, and organizational commitment in hopes of hiring those who would be the best fit for the organization. Hypothesis testing showed no significant association between employee’s interview score and length of employment (in months), r(227) = -.09, p > . 05. While interview scores did not predict turnover, the different types of recruitment sources did. The organization’s website was significantly more “effective” in recruiting long-term employees than any other online source t(63.3) = 3.35 p < .001. A discussion of these results is offered, including the possibility that the interview process did not effectively measure job satisfaction, person–organization fit, or organizational commitment as was expected.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Oct 22nd, 10:00 AM Oct 22nd, 10:55 AM

Can interviews predict an employee's length of employment to a company?

High turnover rates can be detrimental to a company, as they are costly and time consuming and it is extremely expensive to hire and train employees (Gilbertson, 1998). Research has found that individuals who experience higher job satisfaction are less likely to leave their jobs, as they reported higher levels of organizational support (Leider, Harper, Shon, Sellers & Castrucci, 2016). The current study investigated the extent to which a non-profit organization effectively utilized an interview procedure to predict length of employment at the organization. The organization’s interview process was designed to measure potential job satisfaction, person-organization fit, and organizational commitment in hopes of hiring those who would be the best fit for the organization. Hypothesis testing showed no significant association between employee’s interview score and length of employment (in months), r(227) = -.09, p > . 05. While interview scores did not predict turnover, the different types of recruitment sources did. The organization’s website was significantly more “effective” in recruiting long-term employees than any other online source t(63.3) = 3.35 p < .001. A discussion of these results is offered, including the possibility that the interview process did not effectively measure job satisfaction, person–organization fit, or organizational commitment as was expected.