Title

Work-life enrichment and work outcomes: a meta-analysis

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

This project will examine common outcomes of the work-life enrichment construct, along with relevant moderators of those relationships (i.e., demographic variables). Current work-life scholars have called for a greater emphasis on the positive side of the work-life interface, so we employed this meta-analysis as a means to aggregate much of the more recent literature on work-life enrichment. By doing this, our goal is to create a clearer picture of the work-life enrichment nomological network. The present findings focus on seven of the most prominent work-related outcomes of work-life enrichment. Our preliminary results how positive relationships between work-life enrichment and job satisfaction, organizational commitment, engagement, job performance, and organizational citizenship behaviors, as well as negative relationships with turnover intentions and burnout. Specifically, these analyses and the remaining analyses will reveal general relationships of work-life enrichment and possible work- and family-related outcomes. The implications of our results should provide researchers with a more definitive scope of the work-life enrichment construct which can aid future research and the overall conceptualization of work-life enrichment.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Work-life enrichment and work outcomes: a meta-analysis

This project will examine common outcomes of the work-life enrichment construct, along with relevant moderators of those relationships (i.e., demographic variables). Current work-life scholars have called for a greater emphasis on the positive side of the work-life interface, so we employed this meta-analysis as a means to aggregate much of the more recent literature on work-life enrichment. By doing this, our goal is to create a clearer picture of the work-life enrichment nomological network. The present findings focus on seven of the most prominent work-related outcomes of work-life enrichment. Our preliminary results how positive relationships between work-life enrichment and job satisfaction, organizational commitment, engagement, job performance, and organizational citizenship behaviors, as well as negative relationships with turnover intentions and burnout. Specifically, these analyses and the remaining analyses will reveal general relationships of work-life enrichment and possible work- and family-related outcomes. The implications of our results should provide researchers with a more definitive scope of the work-life enrichment construct which can aid future research and the overall conceptualization of work-life enrichment.