Title

Examining the impact of selection practices on subsequent employee engagement

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Employee engagement is often defined as the vigor, dedication, and absorption one feels about and/or displays in the course of working in a particular position. It has long been asserted and assumed that engagement will be highest for employees who “fit” better in their work environment. Applicants determine their anticipated level of fit with the job and organization throughout the selection process. Therefore, it is crucial that the information organizations provide to applicants will allow for as little discrepancy as possible between pre-hire anticipated and post-hire current fit perceptions, to increase the probability that the vacancy will be filled by an applicant best suited for the position. This study is designed to identify if the selection practices used during organizations’ selection processes influence the discrepancy between employees’ anticipated and current person-job and person-organization fit perceptions, as well as employees’ ultimate levels of work engagement. The anticipated results would support this hypothesized mediational model.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Oct 22nd, 10:00 AM Oct 22nd, 10:55 AM

Examining the impact of selection practices on subsequent employee engagement

Employee engagement is often defined as the vigor, dedication, and absorption one feels about and/or displays in the course of working in a particular position. It has long been asserted and assumed that engagement will be highest for employees who “fit” better in their work environment. Applicants determine their anticipated level of fit with the job and organization throughout the selection process. Therefore, it is crucial that the information organizations provide to applicants will allow for as little discrepancy as possible between pre-hire anticipated and post-hire current fit perceptions, to increase the probability that the vacancy will be filled by an applicant best suited for the position. This study is designed to identify if the selection practices used during organizations’ selection processes influence the discrepancy between employees’ anticipated and current person-job and person-organization fit perceptions, as well as employees’ ultimate levels of work engagement. The anticipated results would support this hypothesized mediational model.