Presenter Information

Nicole Wild, General Electric

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

In today’s global business environment, it is important – now more than ever - that leaders are equipped with the necessary skills to empower and inspire employees to deliver results to customers in an uncertain world. Leadership development has become critical toward ensuring that leaders have the support and the opportunity to explore their leadership style and learn how to effectively lead others. This session examines leadership development in the modern age and provides examples of what companies like General Electric (GE) are doing to develop leaders who can operate within a global economy, lead employees through times of extreme change, shape organizational culture, and provide a quality product to customers. From functional leadership programs to corporate university trainings, OTJ stretch assignments, and other development opportunities, companies like GE invest millions every year on the development of their leaders. The goal of course is to make sure the investment is well spent. For that to happen, Human Resource professionals need to align their development strategy with the needs of both the employees and the business. Leaders need to drive wins for their company and inspire employees to reach organizational goals. Human Resources is well positioned to support this effort through effective leadership development initiatives – most importantly, those that are grounded in business strategy and employee engagement. This session will cover current and future leadership development practices told from the perspective of Human Resources at GE.By using a real world example from a 124-year-old Fortune 500 company, the goal is to provide a snapshot into industry practices for leadership development. A secondary goal is to showcase how Human Resource practitioners can utilize their understanding of leadership and partner with companies to provide effective development opportunities and promote leaders that inspire employees, align with customer needs, and direct businesses to success.

Date

10-22-2016

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

presentations

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

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Oct 22nd, 1:30 PM Oct 22nd, 2:30 PM

Current leadership development practices: a GE example

In today’s global business environment, it is important – now more than ever - that leaders are equipped with the necessary skills to empower and inspire employees to deliver results to customers in an uncertain world. Leadership development has become critical toward ensuring that leaders have the support and the opportunity to explore their leadership style and learn how to effectively lead others. This session examines leadership development in the modern age and provides examples of what companies like General Electric (GE) are doing to develop leaders who can operate within a global economy, lead employees through times of extreme change, shape organizational culture, and provide a quality product to customers. From functional leadership programs to corporate university trainings, OTJ stretch assignments, and other development opportunities, companies like GE invest millions every year on the development of their leaders. The goal of course is to make sure the investment is well spent. For that to happen, Human Resource professionals need to align their development strategy with the needs of both the employees and the business. Leaders need to drive wins for their company and inspire employees to reach organizational goals. Human Resources is well positioned to support this effort through effective leadership development initiatives – most importantly, those that are grounded in business strategy and employee engagement. This session will cover current and future leadership development practices told from the perspective of Human Resources at GE.By using a real world example from a 124-year-old Fortune 500 company, the goal is to provide a snapshot into industry practices for leadership development. A secondary goal is to showcase how Human Resource practitioners can utilize their understanding of leadership and partner with companies to provide effective development opportunities and promote leaders that inspire employees, align with customer needs, and direct businesses to success.