Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

This proposal introduces a multi-level model of job insecurity that includes moderating factors as well as important organizational outcomes. The multi-level model of job insecurity contends that job insecurity is a precursor to emotional exhaustion, which affects organizational citizenship behavior and innovation. The model also suggest that economic uncertainty increases the likelihood of feelings of job insecurity and its effects. According to the model, emotional exhaustion that results from job insecurity is worsened when employees are in a life stage in which they are primarily responsible for others and when they increase their use of impression management. Emotional exhaustion, however, can be partially alleviated when the employee has high-quality relationships with coworkers and his or her supervisor as well as a perceived sense of control. Higher levels of emotional exhaustion prevent employees from engaging in organizational citizenship behaviors because they do not have the resources to perform above and beyond their expected duties. Innovation, which requires the freedom to explore new ideas and the freedom to fail, is also hampered by emotional exhaustion. Employees do not have the energy to be creative and the thought of failing is intimidating when they perceive that the company is already considering taking their job away. This multi-level model of job insecurity addresses important gaps in the job insecurity literature. Previous research assumes that employees accept their insecure job situation and that their responses only consist of withdrawal, absenteeism, and turnover. Previous research has not suggested that employees might instead adapt to prevent job loss. Although withdrawal may be one valid response to job insecurity, it is likely not the only valid response. Previous literature also assumes that employees are confident in their ability to find another job because of the presence of a healthy economy with plenty of jobs and suggest that employees consider themselves to be highly employable. These underlying assumptions are prevalent in the job insecurity literature and are almost certainly not always true. Employees could also attempt to work harder to make themselves an invaluable part of their organization or adapt in a number of other ways. Job insecurity literature appears to occasionally lack ecological validity, meaning it can be generalized to realistic human behavior, in favor of research norms. The model will attempt to introduce more ecological validity to the current understanding of job insecurity.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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Oct 28th, 10:00 AM Oct 28th, 10:55 AM

Why worried workers won’t withdraw: A proposal to expand our understanding of the antecedents and consequences of job insecurity.

This proposal introduces a multi-level model of job insecurity that includes moderating factors as well as important organizational outcomes. The multi-level model of job insecurity contends that job insecurity is a precursor to emotional exhaustion, which affects organizational citizenship behavior and innovation. The model also suggest that economic uncertainty increases the likelihood of feelings of job insecurity and its effects. According to the model, emotional exhaustion that results from job insecurity is worsened when employees are in a life stage in which they are primarily responsible for others and when they increase their use of impression management. Emotional exhaustion, however, can be partially alleviated when the employee has high-quality relationships with coworkers and his or her supervisor as well as a perceived sense of control. Higher levels of emotional exhaustion prevent employees from engaging in organizational citizenship behaviors because they do not have the resources to perform above and beyond their expected duties. Innovation, which requires the freedom to explore new ideas and the freedom to fail, is also hampered by emotional exhaustion. Employees do not have the energy to be creative and the thought of failing is intimidating when they perceive that the company is already considering taking their job away. This multi-level model of job insecurity addresses important gaps in the job insecurity literature. Previous research assumes that employees accept their insecure job situation and that their responses only consist of withdrawal, absenteeism, and turnover. Previous research has not suggested that employees might instead adapt to prevent job loss. Although withdrawal may be one valid response to job insecurity, it is likely not the only valid response. Previous literature also assumes that employees are confident in their ability to find another job because of the presence of a healthy economy with plenty of jobs and suggest that employees consider themselves to be highly employable. These underlying assumptions are prevalent in the job insecurity literature and are almost certainly not always true. Employees could also attempt to work harder to make themselves an invaluable part of their organization or adapt in a number of other ways. Job insecurity literature appears to occasionally lack ecological validity, meaning it can be generalized to realistic human behavior, in favor of research norms. The model will attempt to introduce more ecological validity to the current understanding of job insecurity.