Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The individual differences hypothesis suggests that individuals with varying characteristics are attracted to different recruitment sources, which leads to differences in relative effectiveness of recruitment sources. In our study, we will examine the recruitment sources participants use and their decision-making styles to investigate whether there is a relationship between decision-making styles and the sources used when job searching. Though research has been conducted on employees’ performance differences and recruitment sources, these studies generally use the source which employees were hired through, and assume employees prefer that source. Due to the possibility of multiple sources being used, this could be inaccurate. In this study, to measure source preferences, the extent to which job seekers engage in several behaviors relating to different sources when searching for jobs will be analyzed using data that was previously collected through Amazon MTurk (N=255). After categorizing job searching behaviors in a way that reflects different recruiting source preferences using factor analysis, the extent to which individuals using different recruitment sources employ different decision-making styles will be examined.

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Oct 28th, 10:00 AM Oct 28th, 10:55 AM

Recruitment Source Usage and Decision-Making Styles: An Examination of the Individual Differences Hypothesis

The individual differences hypothesis suggests that individuals with varying characteristics are attracted to different recruitment sources, which leads to differences in relative effectiveness of recruitment sources. In our study, we will examine the recruitment sources participants use and their decision-making styles to investigate whether there is a relationship between decision-making styles and the sources used when job searching. Though research has been conducted on employees’ performance differences and recruitment sources, these studies generally use the source which employees were hired through, and assume employees prefer that source. Due to the possibility of multiple sources being used, this could be inaccurate. In this study, to measure source preferences, the extent to which job seekers engage in several behaviors relating to different sources when searching for jobs will be analyzed using data that was previously collected through Amazon MTurk (N=255). After categorizing job searching behaviors in a way that reflects different recruiting source preferences using factor analysis, the extent to which individuals using different recruitment sources employ different decision-making styles will be examined.