Presenter Information

Olrica TurnquestFollow

Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

With this increase in team usage among organizations, the ability to establish teams that are able to achieve team goals is becoming increasingly important (Cohen & Bailey, 1997). Despite the myriad of factors that could potentially impact the team’s success, there is one factor of interest that will be examined with this study. More specifically, this study will seek to investigate the relationship between individual performance and overall team effectiveness with the “coreness” of the role as a mediator. A research study conducted by Humphrey, Morgeson, & Mannor (2009) is an example of support for the idea that some roles among teams are more important than others. From this study, the idea of “core roles” was established. Humphrey et al. (2009) defined “the strategic core role” as “the role or roles on a team that encounter more of the problems that need to be overcome in the team, have a greater exposure to the task that the team is performing, and are more central to the workflow of the team” (Humphrey, et al., 2009, p. 50). The results of this study indicated that those persons holding positions considered to be core roles were more crucial to overall team effectiveness. At a Southeastern State University, an airline simulation capstone course, known as the Flight Operations Center-Unified Simulation (FOCUS) Lab proved to be the ideal environment to assess this relationship. With ten positions, including Flight Operations Coordinator (FOC), Maintenance Control, Maintenance Planning, Crew Scheduling, Weather Operations, Ramp Tower, Flight Scheduling (FOD 1), Flight Planning (FOD 2), Pilot, and Pseudo Pilot, it should come as no surprise that some roles are more salient to overall team success than others. This setting will allow the desired relationship to be studied in among a team in an already established setting. Data collected from the FOUCUS lab will be examined in this study. The data will be analyzed using a combination of ANOVAs, Correlations, and Regression Tests. Based on the extent literature related to this topic, the main hypothesis that is going to be assessed is: “The more core/central the role is, the stronger the relationship will be between Individual Job Performance and Team Effectiveness.”

Date

October 2017

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Are you really at the center of our success?: The effect of core roles on the relationship between individual performance and team performance

With this increase in team usage among organizations, the ability to establish teams that are able to achieve team goals is becoming increasingly important (Cohen & Bailey, 1997). Despite the myriad of factors that could potentially impact the team’s success, there is one factor of interest that will be examined with this study. More specifically, this study will seek to investigate the relationship between individual performance and overall team effectiveness with the “coreness” of the role as a mediator. A research study conducted by Humphrey, Morgeson, & Mannor (2009) is an example of support for the idea that some roles among teams are more important than others. From this study, the idea of “core roles” was established. Humphrey et al. (2009) defined “the strategic core role” as “the role or roles on a team that encounter more of the problems that need to be overcome in the team, have a greater exposure to the task that the team is performing, and are more central to the workflow of the team” (Humphrey, et al., 2009, p. 50). The results of this study indicated that those persons holding positions considered to be core roles were more crucial to overall team effectiveness. At a Southeastern State University, an airline simulation capstone course, known as the Flight Operations Center-Unified Simulation (FOCUS) Lab proved to be the ideal environment to assess this relationship. With ten positions, including Flight Operations Coordinator (FOC), Maintenance Control, Maintenance Planning, Crew Scheduling, Weather Operations, Ramp Tower, Flight Scheduling (FOD 1), Flight Planning (FOD 2), Pilot, and Pseudo Pilot, it should come as no surprise that some roles are more salient to overall team success than others. This setting will allow the desired relationship to be studied in among a team in an already established setting. Data collected from the FOUCUS lab will be examined in this study. The data will be analyzed using a combination of ANOVAs, Correlations, and Regression Tests. Based on the extent literature related to this topic, the main hypothesis that is going to be assessed is: “The more core/central the role is, the stronger the relationship will be between Individual Job Performance and Team Effectiveness.”