Committee Chair

O'Leary, Brian J.

Committee Member

Biderman, Michael D.; Weathington, Bart L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Businesses are more marketable if they have a global presence. However, with global expansion comes a need to communicate with organizations having diverse cultural backgrounds. This causes issues when selecting expatriates for the job. Expatriates possessing particular characteristics may adjust better than others. Research supports both cultural intelligence (CQ) and personality as valid predictors of cross-cultural adjustment, but do those higher in CQ adapt better than those with culturally compatible personality factors? I hypothesized that cultural intelligence (CQ) accounts for more incremental validity of crosscultural adjustment than personality alone. The sample of approximately 111 foreign expatriates working in various countries completed measures of CQ (CQS; Earley & Ang, 2003), personality (50-item IPIP), and cultural adjustment components (Wilson & Ward, 2010). The results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis supported the hypothesis indicating the need to consider CQ in the expatriate selection process.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2012

Subject

Business anthropology; Corporate culture; Cultural intelligence; Intercultural communication; Management -- Cross-cultural studies

Keyword

Cultural intelligence; Expatriates; Global businesses

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology | Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 64 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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