Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Committee Member

Biderman, Michael D.; Weathington, Bart

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The present study examined how the Five Factor Model (FFM) personality traits influence the stress process experienced by manufacturing workers (N = 439) in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). More specifically, the mediating effects from perceived stressors (interpersonal conflict, quantitative workload, and role conflict, and role ambiguity) on the relationships between three FFM traits (neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness) with strains (depression, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction) were examined. The moderating effects of three FFM traits on the relationships between perceived stressors and strains were also examined. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses and multiple me diation bootstrap analyses were conducted to examine hypotheses. The results indicated that FFM traits related to how individuals perceive stressors. Perceived role conflict mediated the relationships between neuroticism, with job satisfaction.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2009

Subject

Work environment -- China; Job satisfaction -- China

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Language

English

Call Number

vi, 82 leaves

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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